Closed

The Shoals Provincial Park

There was a skiff of snow on the ground as we rolled along Highway 101 and pulled up to the closed gates.  As we began walking along the road into the park, I thought back to my earlier visit to Greenwater Provincial Park and wondered if it would be as well preserved.

In little time we were greeted by a ruffled grouse, another similiarity to the aforementioned park.  I was suprised, however, to flush about 5 more before we left.

Greenwater Provincial Park

As one who frequents Provincial Parks for camping, when I heard that there were a few that had been closed, permanently, I knew I would have to take the opportunity to have a look at how nature reclaims these spaces.  I spend a lot of time in Gogama, and that seemed the perfect jumping-off point for a trip to the former Greenwater Provincial Park.  As it turns out, once wouldn't be enough.

Stephenville AFS

Belonging to the United States Air Force, construction of this radar station began in 1951 and was completed two years later.

In 1971, control of the station was handed over to the Royal Canadian Air Force, and it was promptly closed.  Despite being part of the Pinetree Line, and having radar designed for use with the SAGE system, the station was never made part of the SAGE network.

Kingston Penitentiary

We arrived on a bright and sunny May morning, parked and proceeded to the front entrance to begin our tour.  My attention was initially distracted by the person positioned there to check me in and give me instructions before I noticed the sheer magnitude and domination of this entrance.  Of course, that was its design...  Instant intimidation of anyone entering through the massive doors.

Tembec Sawmill

History: 

The buildings on this 136-acre property were first constructed in 1973 by Sklar Furniture. Later, it would be taken over by G.W. Martin and expanded. Tembec would eventually take over Martin's operations here, and the number of jobs would, at one point, peak at 500.

George's Island

History: 

Originally named Ile a la Raquette (Snowshoe Island), this island located in Halifax harbour was renamed George Island in 1749 after King George II. From the mid-18th century until after World War II, it played a part in the defense of Halifax.

During the 1750's, the island served as a prison of Acadians during the Great Upheaval.

Rockwood Asylum for the Criminally Insane

History: 

Construction of Rockwood Asylum began in 1859 to house the "criminally insane" of Kingston Penitentiary. The asylum's site overlooking Lake Ontario was thought to have a calming effect on patients. The new limestone edifice - still situated near here - began accepting non-criminal patients in 1868. Rockwood became part of the Ontario provincial asylum system in 1877.