Industrial https://mikeonline.ca/category_Industrial en Rose Blanche Fish Plant https://mikeonline.ca/gallery_RB_Fishplant <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Rose Blanche Fish Plant</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 01/08/2018 - 15:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify">While driving along the South coast of Newfoundland, I was exploring every side road.  I was surprised to see a small harbour with a large building and a few vehicles parked around it.  Initially, I wrote it off and looked for a place to turn around.  After a second glance, I realized that there were some gaping holes in the wall and no activity inside.  Perhaps this warranted a closer look at what turned out to be a fish processing plant.</p> <p class="text-align-justify"><img alt="Seeing through a missing wall to the harbour." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="775c3d08-fcb7-4367-892d-0026b2283d54" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/DSC_9512_0.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">Incomplete at this time, my research thus far seems to indicate the plant was built in the 1950's or '60's as a government project to modernize and centralize fish processing operations in Newfoundland.  Years of issues managing the fishing resource have caused the plant to be opened and closed repeatedly, keeping employment in the area always in question.</p> <p class="text-align-justify"><img alt="Room with a pump and many pipes running everywhere." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="72ffc79b-e158-4563-b527-00b26e4d02a1" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/DSC_9525_0.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">I was able to determine that the province expropriated the plant in 1988, from Eldorado Seafoods Ltd.  It was then leased to Conpak Seafoods until it closed again in December, 1993.  It lay dormant until, in August, 1996, it was announced that it would reopen as a joint venture between H.B. Dawe Ltd. of Newfoundland, and Ancoba Inc. of Montreal, Quebec. By 1998, the province had to get involved in labour issues between the owners and workers.  I have been unable to determine what happened after that, or when the plant finally closed down.</p> <p class="text-align-justify"><img alt="Looking along the wharf at one of the closed buildings on the site." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="829c4fe5-dd01-4993-a622-1d06059930db" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/DSC_9544.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">I spoke with a gentleman on the wharf who told me that the owners had walked away with anything of value one day, and that was the end.  Livelihood in the community dropped to near nothing as people moved elsewhere to piece their lives back together.  A tale told over and over in so many communities throughout the province.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=504&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="08mk6xUpKythHALrijhZNu2O-T-BPHS2pBVYT35wZu4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 08 Jan 2018 20:15:00 +0000 Mike 504 at https://mikeonline.ca Oranienburg Bakery https://mikeonline.ca/gallery_Oranienburg_Bakery <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Oranienburg Bakery</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 08/17/2015 - 11:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>History: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">The bakery was built in 1939 as one of many businesses to be run by the German <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schutzstaffel" target="_blank">SS</a>. Because the war was already making raw materials difficult to acquire, it didn't actually open until 1941.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">At this point, 80 prisoners from <a href="http://urbexobsession.com/urbexobsession.com/gallery_Sachsenhausen" target="_blank">Sachsenhausen Concentration Camp</a> worked to produce 10,000 loaves of bread daily. With the introduction of shift work, and the addition of two new ovens, production was ramped up to over 40,000 loaves per day. This bread was provided to prisoners in several concentration camps.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">After the war, the Soviet Army continued operation of the bakery until 1948 when it was acquired by a private firm. It finally closed its door permanently in 1991.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Much of the interior was destroyed by fire in 1994.</p> <hr /><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>Personal Commentary:</strong> </p> <p class="text-align-justify">This isn't part of the tour, nor is the brick factory remains that are nearby. I'm not sure why they aren't since they represent a significant part of the day-to-day strife faced by the inmates of the concentration camps, but for some reason they're left out.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">We took a brief look around the site. Since this bakery had been part of private industry for many years after the war, there was probably nothing really left over to indicate its dark past.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=154&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="QgrfeSUiNDR3uuL2CIVfxHCWMMPumYnRnzE8ZPulVo8"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 17 Aug 2015 15:15:00 +0000 Mike 154 at https://mikeonline.ca https://mikeonline.ca/gallery_Oranienburg_Bakery#comments Peenemunde Power Plant and Museum https://mikeonline.ca/gallery_Peenemunde_Museum <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Peenemunde Power Plant and Museum</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 07/27/2015 - 11:15</span> <div class="field field--name-field-see-also field--type-entity-reference field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">See Also</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="/gallery_VKN_Barracks" hreflang="en">Versuchskommando Nord Barracks</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>History: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify"><b>V-1</b></p> <p class="text-align-justify">Design of the V-1 began as an exercise to build a remote-controlled aircraft that could carry a payload of 1,000 kg for a distance of 500 km. After several design and staffing changes, the <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fieseler" target="_blank">Fieseler Aircraft Company</a>, in association with <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argus_Motoren" target="_blank">Argus Motoren</a>, proposed the final design of the "flying bomb", or "buzz bomb" as it was sometimes known. On June 19, 1942, the concept was approved, production was given a high priority, and development began at Peenemunde West.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">By this point, development of the V-2 was already nearing completion.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">The V-1's iconic jet engine was a gasoline-powered pulse jet. The small wings made for a very high stall speed so take-off was generally around 580 km/h. This was mostly accomplished using a catapult, but was sometimes done by launching from another aircraft. Once launched, it flew between 600 and 900m putting a bit too high for effective use of the light anti-aircraft guns of the day, and slightly too low for the heavier guns. Eventually, however, radar-guided guns were deployed by mid 1944 accounting for the failure of almost 82% of the bombs launched.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Generally, the V-1 attacks on Great Britain ended by September, 1944 as the effectiveness of the bombs was becoming very limited, and as the launch facilities in France were being overrun. The last V-1 to strike British soil was launched on March, 29, 1945, hitting Datchworth.</p> <p class="text-align-justify"><b>V-2 (A-4)</b></p> <p class="text-align-justify">Early experiments into rockets began at a weapons testing range near Kummersdorf, Germany. As the rockets increased in size and power, it wasn't long before these facilities were no longer suitable and a search began for another location.</p> <p class="text-align-justify"><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wernher_von_Braun" target="_blank">Werner von Braun's</a> mother suggested Peenemunde, and he decided to check it out. It met all of the requirements including being flat, having a lengthy coastline and being remote enough for security to be easier to maintain. In the spring of 1936, construction began on two new facilities, the Luftwaffe's facility, Peenemunde West, and the Army's facility, Peenemunde East.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Operations were moved to the partially completed site the following year. The A-3 prototype proved to have aerodynamic issues and a faulty 3-axis gyroscope. Four launch attempts of this design all resulted in the rockets crashing. To overcome this, the world's most sophisticated wind tunnel was constructed capable of simulating speeds over Mach 4. After many improvements and further testing, a more promising prototype emerged.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">In the spring of 1939, Hitler and his entourage toured the old facility at Kummersdorf to avoid calling attention to Peenemunde. Von Braun carried out several demonstrations, but Hitler seemed barely interested.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">The Army facility was completed in the fall of 1939, and work began on the highly successful A-5 prototype using the modified airframe, and new guidance system from Siemens. By the end of that year, work on the final production version of the rocket was ready. By this point, however, the war was already consuming the available materials and labour required for the project. The officer in charge, General von Brauchitsch ordered that the Army maintain necessary supplies, but that was countermanded by Hitler.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">By May, 1940, the project had attracted the attention of <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heinrich_Himmler" target="_blank">Heinrich Himmler</a>, head of the SS. Von Braun was offered an officer's rank of Lieutenant in the SS and was encouraged to accept. This association served to help ensure the resources required. While many of those working on the project in the initial stages were paid, skilled workers, a growing percentage were brought in to the Karlhagen Labour Camp just south of the testing facilities.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Despite all of the challenges, the A-4, final version first launched on October 3, 1942, and was renamed the V-2. Production began in 1943, but by this point the Allies had heard about the work being carried out at Peenemunde, and set out to destroy it in <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Hydra_%281943%29" target="_blank">Operation Hydra</a>.</p> <p class="text-align-justify"><b>The Beginning of the End</b></p> <p class="text-align-justify">A bombing raid was carried out on the night of August 17, 1943 and was conducted in three waves. The first wave targeted the sleeping and living quarters of the scientists and skilled employees. The second wave targeted the workshops building components. The third wave targeted the experimental station, damaging labs and offices. While it was estimated that the raid caused a delay of two months, it is generally considered to have been ineffective as most of the development work of the two weapons was already complete.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Facilities were decentralized to other locations in the hopes of avoid this happening again. In addition, the Germans also fabricated additional damage to the facility by creating craters near critical areas, and painting damage to the roofs of buildings to throw off damage assessments. Despite these precautions, there were three more Allied bombing attacks on the facility, and by the time the Soviets invaded in 1945, they found mostly ruins.</p> <p class="text-align-justify"><b>Aftermath</b><br /> Several countries continued to make use of the V-1 design, including France, using them as target drones, the Soviet Union continued to improve the weapon into the 1950's, and the United States quickly adapted them for potential use in Japan, but saw little use for them after the use of atomic weapons. The V-2 was snatched up by both the United States and the USSR, as were the scientists involved in their development. Werner von Braun was brought to the United States and played a pivotal role in NASA's space race.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">It is interesting to note that the <a href="http://www.airspacemag.com/space/the-first-photo-from-space-13721411/?no-ist" target="_blank">first photograph taken from space</a> was taken from a V-2 launched in 1946 by the US.</p> <hr /><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>Personal Commentary: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">Arriving in Germany in the midst of a heat wave, we decided the first place to check out should be close to the Baltic Sea where, we hoped, things would be slightly cooler. This is a location I've wanted to check out for quite a long time and I was quite eager.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">The power plant has been converted for use as the primary display area of the museum, but parts of it remain out of bounds.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">I really only have one negative thing to say about it.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Ruins of this facility can be found spread out over a large area. However, aside from the power plant, everything is fenced off and inaccessible.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">That aside, the information and artifacts in the museum are actually quite impressive.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="field field--name-field-videos-embed field--type-video-embed-field field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">Videos</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><div class="video-embed-field-responsive-video"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/MCdlBc__3kg?autoplay=1&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> </div> <div class="field__item"><div class="video-embed-field-responsive-video"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Ii7uwp1SRIM?autoplay=1&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> </div> <div class="field__item"><div class="video-embed-field-responsive-video"><iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/QjXwsj8kHT4?autoplay=1&amp;start=0&amp;rel=0"></iframe> </div> </div> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=162&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="vOPMBPulFh8dPMBRXNJUQ6aIYxd8xKWLPsEPNUKYuV4"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 27 Jul 2015 15:15:00 +0000 Mike 162 at https://mikeonline.ca https://mikeonline.ca/gallery_Peenemunde_Museum#comments Glovertown Pulp and Paper https://mikeonline.ca/gallery_Glovertown_Mill <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Glovertown Pulp and Paper</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 07/25/2014 - 15:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>History: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">The Terra Nova Sulphite Company sought funding for the construction of a new pulp and paper mill near present-day Glovertown, Newfoundland. The location was considered ideal because it was close to sea lanes, railways and a river for transporting logs and generating electricity.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">They found investors from Norway who would help to finance the project. Construction began early in 1921, but by the fall, money markets were such that the Norwegians were horsed to pull out of the deal, leaving no money for the completion of the project. Terra Nova pursued loans from the Government of Newfoundland, but were denied.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">In 1923, the Anglo-Newfoundland Development Company (AND Co) purchased the mill, its 1,172 square miles of timber rights, and its hydro rights and prepared for operation. They sent a relatively small load of wood to the mill as a test of its capacity and efficiency. Very quickly, they came to the conclusion that the mill was inadequate for their needs and closed it down. The equipment inside was dismantled and distributed to other mills operated by AND Co.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">This was a devastating blow to a town that was eagerly looking forward to the employment and economic opportunities it appeared the mill would bring.</p> <hr /><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>Personal Commentary: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">While wandering Google Earth, looking for interesting places while on vacation in Newfoundland, I spotted this mill.  It wasn't difficult to see, and certainly looked interesting, so I made note of it.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">When we arrived, I wasn't disappointed.  Though the building was quite empty, it had a form and character that made it interesting nevertheless.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">We went to look at the nearby dam and met a local who was there with her dog.  It seems the property is at least being enjoyed.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">I pulled out my drone and decided to get a couple of higher-level photographs that are included in the set below.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=235&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="8T4F72cakQedJ_NQYCoGa3zfa8isrVN_rtchRneZU1g"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Fri, 25 Jul 2014 19:15:00 +0000 Mike 235 at https://mikeonline.ca https://mikeonline.ca/gallery_Glovertown_Mill#comments Milo Mill https://mikeonline.ca/gallery_Milo_Mill <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Milo Mill</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 11/18/2013 - 15:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>History: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">I am able to find very little history on this site except that a paper mill was built here in 1890 which burned down in 1910. It was subsequently rebuilt. Whether this is the rebuilt mill is uncertain, and the circumstances of its eventual closure are unknown to me. If anyone can point me in a direction for further detail, it would be appreciated.</p> <hr /><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>Personal Commentary: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">The remnants of this mill are a short distance away from the <a href="/gallery_Cascade_Mill">Cascade Mill</a> on the same river.  I had noticed both of these on Google Earth some time ago and thought they might be interesting to check out.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">When I pulled in, I was unaware that I would have to contend with security.  A watch-goat stood there, tethered, eyeballing me suspiciously as I got out.  I paid little attention to him as I began taking pictures.  When I was finished however I went over to make friends.  He came to me, tail wagging like a friendly dog and after a brief scratching behind the ears tried to butt me.  He missed.  I'm familiar enough with goat behavior to anticipate that happening.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">I left Mr. Grumpy to himself and continued on with my day.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=246&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="FF-7icwQo5snYGvNstqEjyeUXKNTPVJTjeN46k5aNxo"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 18 Nov 2013 20:15:00 +0000 Mike 246 at https://mikeonline.ca Cascade Mill https://mikeonline.ca/gallery_Cascade_Mill <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Cascade Mill</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 11/11/2013 - 15:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>History: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">In 1825, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meredith_Mallory" target="_blank">Meredith Mallory</a> acquired this property but found it difficult to access the water. Access roads were made, and trees cleared until a site was opened for a dam, grist mill and saw mill.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">In 1866, a paper mill was built here but burned down in 1869. It was rebuilt and continued operation until 1900 when the property was purchased by Edward R. Taylor.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Taylor installed hydroelectric turbines to create <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_disulfide" target="_blank">carbon-bi-sulfide</a>, a chemical used as a solvent, as an ingredient in some insecticides, and rayon for tires.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Eventually, the plant became part of the Baker Chemical Company, but was then closed in 1966 due to a lack of demand for carbon-bi-sulfide.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Today, the property is owned by the Friends of the Outlet Trail.</p> <hr /><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>Personal Commentary: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">I had parked the truck by the side of the closest road and set out on foot. The GPS claimed I could drive right up to the place, but the gate and apparently disused road said otherwise. That's ok, it's a nice day for a walk.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">It didn't take long to arrive, having been passed by people jogging and riding bikes. At first, however, I was disappointed as it appeared to be a park, It was, indeed, a park, but whoever was running it hadn't taken all of the usual park-like paranoid precautions against anyone seeing the inside of the buildings. Ok, maybe a sign or two, but that was about it. Otherwise, the buildings turned out to be pretty much open for inspection.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">There wasn't a great deal to see, but it was certainly a scenic location with the water rushing by right beside it. All in all, a fun stop on an otherwise active day.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=248&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="GGW2deHzGGFO3nGzc69E6w4Hiw52JWxwdnr61QKIGdw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 11 Nov 2013 20:15:00 +0000 Mike 248 at https://mikeonline.ca Holmes Foundry https://mikeonline.ca/gallery_Holmes_Foundry <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Holmes Foundry</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 09/23/2013 - 15:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>History: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">Business here began in 1918 as Holmes Blunt Ltd., opened by J.S. Blunt. The foundry manufactured car parts, predominantly engine-casting blocks for Ford.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">In 1937, the workers here took part in a sit-down strike. It was shortlived as, 48 hours later, the workers were driven away from the plant by armed and violent hired thugs.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">January of 1966 brought the sale of 25% of the plant to AMC, with the remaining 75% being acquired by 1970.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Chrysler acquired the company in 1987 and announced they would be shutting it down by September 16, 1988. During its 70-year history, this operation exposed countless workers to "harmful and excessive hazards".</p> <p class="text-align-justify">In 1987, the year before the complex was closed, the Ministry of Labour commissioned a health study It reported that "there was a six-fold increase in lung cancer mortality among the Holmes workers exposed to asbestos for two years or more. It also documented an eleven-fold increase in respiratory disease mortality and a four-fold excess of all malignancies."</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Much more detail about the effects on the workers can be found <a href="http://www.caw.ca/en/rev-ministry-of-labour-documents-pertaining-to-holmes-foundry-sarnia-ontario-1950-1988.htm" target="_blank">here</a>. It's definitely worth at least a cursory read, and may surprise you how our government treated the workers.</p> <hr /><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>Personal Commentary: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">I had heard about this building, but at the time of my arrival, I knew nothing of its past. It wasn't until I began researching that I even found out its correct name. To read its history, however, was step into a strange world of uncaring corporations, and men dying to put food on the table for their families.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">As I said, I knew nothing of this as I stepped into this building. I did not know that beyond it had once been many more buildings far larger than this, that had all been demolished already. All I saw, initially, was a basically empty building with a bit of scattered refuse. Despite that, it didn't take long for me to discover that the building had been visited by some talented painters. Sure, there were the usual, unimagniative tags and expletives amid crudely drawn male parts, but a little poking turned up true artistry that I always feel is going to waste on places like this.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">I didn't spend a long time here. As I said, it was pretty gutted. The paint did make the stop worthwhile.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=255&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="em_5KCeHThd-ZauYp_331btgDFXYjlJXyIEqUthviEc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 23 Sep 2013 19:15:00 +0000 Mike 255 at https://mikeonline.ca https://mikeonline.ca/gallery_Holmes_Foundry#comments Forest Castle Brewery https://mikeonline.ca/gallery_Forest_Castle_Brewery <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Forest Castle Brewery</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 08/20/2013 - 15:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>History: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">At first I had no idea what this place was, and had in fact listed it here simply as an Unknown Building in Pennsylvania. Thanks to some great help from Bernard Stiroh at <a href="http://duryeapa.com/" target="_blank">duryeapa.com</a>, I found out that this was the Forest Castle Brewery.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">What little history I've been able to acquire so far is that it was built in 1872 and opened by John A. Burschel, a German Immigrant, in 1873, employing 50 men. Construction cost $30,000 at the time.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">It appears, however, that it changed hands in 1878 becoming the H.R. Hughes &amp; Co. Brewery. A partnership between Richard M. Hughes and Joseph H. Glennon was formed as the company became the Hughes &amp; Glennon Brewery in 1887. A 217 foot well was drilled giving the brewery the name Pure Deep Rock. After 1894, history becomes a bit sketchy.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">An article in the Scranton Republican dated October 9, 1900, indicates that there was a court case against Hughes &amp; Glennon because they were neglecting the business and didn't want to allow the Pennsylvania Brewing Company install a new manager. it seems that at this point, even the court was a bit confused about what jurisdiction the Pennsylvania Brewing Company had in the runnings of the brewery.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">The building was purchased in 1917 by J.C. Kenyon with the intention of opening a paper mill. With the business now running as Exeter Paper Corp, it was destroyed by fire on April 11, 1928.</p> <hr /><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>Personal Commentary: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">Somewhat dejected from missing out on a different location, this little place appeared around a curve as if a consolation. Initially, I had no idea what it was, but subsequent research, and input from some of my visitors helped to clear up the mystery quite quickly.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=258&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="LoJLFddYA2VfMnMRQAChooRCvH0FQFrhJQVLdxfOrdc"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Tue, 20 Aug 2013 19:15:00 +0000 Mike 258 at https://mikeonline.ca Parham Mill https://mikeonline.ca/gallery_Parham_Mill <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Parham Mill</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 07/02/2013 - 15:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify">I spotted this place buried under the foliage and stopped in for a look. Almost immediately, however, I was set upon by a ravenous flock of mosquitoes who seemed determined to bleed me dry.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Unfortunately, I didn't stay long.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=268&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="ogIy6RgyMtQ0fWEFtVlADfljaI-y9dCJ-osZuFait3A"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Tue, 02 Jul 2013 19:15:00 +0000 Mike 268 at https://mikeonline.ca https://mikeonline.ca/gallery_Parham_Mill#comments Marlborough Cement Factory https://mikeonline.ca/gallery_Marlborough_Cement <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Marlborough Cement Factory</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Tue, 05/21/2013 - 15:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>History: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">The Marlborough Cement Factory was apparently built in 1902 and was, for a time, the world's largest cement factory. Nearby, a company town sprang up that featured surprising facilities including an opera house.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">On this location, the company mined and processed <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marl" target="_blank">marl</a> which was in that period a component of cement. When the process changed, no longer using marl, the company became unprofitable and fell into bankruptcy by 1907. By the end, the company demolished many of the building for salvage and scrap.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">By the end of World War I, little more than a ghost town was left.</p> <hr /><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>Personal Commentary: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">There wasn't a great deal left to see here, although, as I understand it, there was a bit more to be found deeper in the woods. In the brief time I was there, I had already removed a tick and decided that going further in was not something I felt like doing.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Certainly the tangible evidence doesn't point to the interesting history above, but if you happen to be in the area, it's worth a look. Watch for ticks and keep your eyes peeled for deer. There appear to be lots of both.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=517&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="NJunAXrTM7DboLKsvBQFGmy3YMJ5nACBDRu6IfWq0gw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Tue, 21 May 2013 19:15:00 +0000 Mike 517 at https://mikeonline.ca https://mikeonline.ca/gallery_Marlborough_Cement#comments