Semi-active https://mikeonline.ca/status_Semi_Active en Salton Sea https://mikeonline.ca/gallery_Salton_Sea <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Salton Sea</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 04/23/2018 - 16:00</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify">I arrived in my nice, clean, white, rented Equinox.  The windows were up, and the cool air was coming from the air conditioner.  The sun was shining, and I was loving being away from the cold and snow of Canada.  When I arrived, first at Salton City, I drove close to the beach and stopped.  I looked out over the shimmering water, turned off the engine and got out...  THE STENCH!  Nothing had prepared me for the smell.  Like seaweed and rotting fish, yet somehow much, much worse.  I looked around, noticed that some of the houses were actually occupied and thought, "how do they live with the stench?".</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Salton Sea began as an accident, and it's potential as a vacation resort ended as an accident.</p> <p class="text-align-justify"><img alt="One of many abandoned buildings" data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="e36f613d-afaa-468c-bf87-e7b4c0676a0d" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/DSC_0154.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">In 1905, the California Development Company attempted to increase the water to the area for farming.  Canals were dug from the Colorado River into the Imperial Valley.  These canals began to fill with silt, restricting the water flow, so the engineers made a cut in bank of the river to divert even more water.  It was too much.  The canal was overwhelmed, and the river flowed freely into a basin for two years before repairs were completed.  This was the birth of the Salton Sea.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">As I wandered the deserted streets of Salton City, and then Salton Sea Beach, it was surreal.  The streets were all there although they had few stop signs, or other types of traffic control.  You could tell that this area was much more built up than it is now, but it was hard to imagine.  Between the heat, the desert sand, and the smell, it was almost impossible to imagine this as it once was; a busy, thriving vacation spot.</p> <p class="text-align-justify"><img alt="Sign for a golf course that was never built." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="dff9f6f6-b220-442a-b70b-c0804a600cca" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/DSC_0175.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">The area began development during the late 1950's, early 1960's.  The streets, power grid, and other infrastructure were planned for a population of over 40,000.  With rising water, salinity, and pollution from farm run-off, most properties were abandoned by the 1980's.  It wasn't the end of a dream, because the dream simply never materialized.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">i noticed that Salton Sea Beach seemed to be more about trailers and what most would consider cottages than what I saw in Salton City.  A number of fires appear to have destroyed some of the remaining structures, and graffiti and vandalism are everywhere.</p> <p class="text-align-justify"><img alt="Tires inside an abandoned garage." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="ccd75efb-c1c1-49a7-a301-fa525ff286ee" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/DSC_0198.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">With property costs so high in California at the moment, the lure of lots priced from $4,000 each is clearly attractive as the number of permanent residents appears to be on the climb again.  Much will depend, of course, on the nearby employment opportunities, beyond the casino located across the highway.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">As the sun disappeared behind the mountains, I was keenly aware that my time was up.  It was time to head back to San Diego after enjoying my opportunity to check a place off my bucket list.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=37115&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="Tv95u33WoTVUqkfWXgbvzobUhe9l7NcUXL5u5aG6AH0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 23 Apr 2018 20:00:00 +0000 Mike 37115 at https://mikeonline.ca Jackfish Ghost Town https://mikeonline.ca/gallery_Jackfish <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Jackfish Ghost Town</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 08/28/2017 - 15:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify">As is often the case with these things, I wasn't completely sure as to the exact location of this town when I arrived.  In fact, I wasn't completely sure there was even anything left to see.  However, we were on vacation, we were in the area, give or take a few hundred kilometres, why not go take a look.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">When we were close to the spot, I decided to park the truck and consider two possible directions we could begin hiking.  One seemed most likely, so I chose to eliminate the other first.  As it turns out, both were right.</p> <p><img alt="Max inspecting the trail." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="5e5bb72d-b0bc-40b0-9a6e-fb4b915b0db8" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/DSC_8888.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">Nearing the tracks, we saw a well-beaten path on the far side, so often a clue when exploring.  We crossed over and followed it, only to emerge on a beautiful section of beach and a tent...  Someone was camping here, although not currently at home.  Clearly this wasn't where we wanted to be, so after giving the dog a chance to swim a bit on a warm day, we backtracked up the path to the railway.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">People had arrived in a car, and a second vehicle was approaching.  When I spoke to the first, I found out that this was the person camping on the beach, and that the place I was looking for was a little ways down the rail line.  By this time, the second group of two people arrived.  The man indicated that he had spent time here in his youth and was here to see what was left.  We were advised that there were a few narrow rock cuts along the track, and that there were frequent trains.  We would need to be careful.</p> <p><img alt="Old car in the woods." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="64d048e4-c250-45b2-a84e-7bf2c33c1458" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/DSC_8916.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">Jackfish existed before the <a href="http://www.cpr.ca/en" target="_blank">CPR</a> came along, mostly as a small fishing community.  It was the railway, however, that caused it rapid and immense growth.  Between 1883 and 1885, the railway, and a siding, were constructed here allowing the passing of trains in opposite directions.  After almost a decade, a port was established for the unloading of coal, building Jackfish up into a recoaling and watering station for the CPR's steam engines, here and in <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schreiber,_Ontario" target="_blank">Shreiber</a> and <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_River,_Ontario" target="_blank">White River</a>.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">We began our westward hike along the track and came quickly upon a large collapsed concrete structure on the south side.  It appears to have been a coal tipple that fell over.  Given its size and weight, I could just imagine the sound it must have made.</p> <p><img alt="Remains of an old house." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="a1e96245-9818-43e8-a1c4-1a37aca8422f" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/DSC_8924.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">A little further along, on the north side of the track, we encountered the remains of a water tower.  Not yet knowing the history of this place, I came to the conclusion that coal and water were the most likely reason for this town's existence.  As we continued along, we began to notice other details.  A ramp to raise a car for repairs.  An old car.  Open foundations with old furnaces cold and covered in moss.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">In the 1930's, things continued just as busy as a local lumber company began using the port to ship wood to US pulp mills.  In the 40's, the war made its impact known as those of Japanese decent were placed in internment camps including one here at Jackfish.  The men were used to build the nearby Trans-Canada Highway.</p> <p><img alt="Steps up to a foundation in the woods." data-entity-type="file" data-entity-uuid="46efc5ab-36aa-4ad6-a768-a88e34336e64" src="/sites/default/files/inline-images/DSC_8947.jpg" /></p> <p class="text-align-justify">With the rise of the diesel engine, coal began to give way, and so did Jackfish's importance to the CPR.  Things began to wind down, and people began to close up and move away as fortunes here began to diminish.  In 1960, the town's hotel burned down, and by three years later, only two families remained living here.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">We watched a few of the new trains go past along the tracks as we explored.  No one seemed surprised we were there.  A couple of camps were still occupied, probably on a seasonal basis, and the signs of the town's former glory and becoming ever more difficult to find.  Still painted in relatively small white letters on the rock face, however, was "Jackfish Ontario". </p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=8&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="y06zzPyLr_ZZKapL-Bs_GL7apmqwU5Rs0pED5YVHxJs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 28 Aug 2017 19:15:00 +0000 Mike 8 at https://mikeonline.ca Goldfield and Victor, Colorado https://mikeonline.ca/gallery_Goldfield_Victor <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Goldfield and Victor, Colorado</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Wed, 03/01/2017 - 06:52</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify">Fairness requires that I give each of these towns their own, individual stories.</p> <p class="text-align-justify"><strong>Goldfield, Colorado</strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">Established in 1894 by the Portland Town and Mineral Company, lots of land were sold, many for $25, to the employees of the various mines that opened in the surrounding area.  The town grew quickly, and houses continued to be built.  By 1900, the town's population was over 3,500, and it featured a fire department, running water from a reservoir, arc street lights and a "Pest House" for transients or people with contagious disease like TB.  Churches, schools and a City Hall also sprung up as new services continued to be provided to the growing population.  Even an electric streetcar system was established linking Goldfield to the towns of Independence and Victor nearby.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Violent strikes occurred in 1903 the required the intervention of the National Guard.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">When World War I began, many men were shifted from the gold mines to mines of more essential metals in other towns.  During this time, a housing shortage in Wyoming caused a number of homes in Goldfield to be loaded onto flatbed rail cars and moved away.  Men returning after the war would discover their homes gone.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">The town continued to decline and the post office closed in 1932.  By 2010, the population was just 49.</p> <hr /><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>Victor, Colorado</strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">Founded in 1891, Victor was named after the nearby gold mine.  It grew so quickly, because of the surrounding mines, that it achieved city status in just three years.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">In August, 1899, the entire business district was destroyed by fire in a mere 5 hours.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">In 1903, Victor felt the effects of the same strike action as Goldfield.  Unionization against the work conditions of the mines brought about a period that would be called the Colorado Labour Wars.  The union hall is still standing and allegedly features some bullet holes from that time.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Mining in the area continued to decline steadily until full closure in 1962.  From 18,000 residents at the turn of the century, the town reported a population of only 397 by 2010.  Renewed mining operations have helped in that regard, but it will never see its days of past glory again.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=88&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="Bswn6wRkqO28mOtKs6HQ_eGXeOnNL_CjAtRNLUAzxuA"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Wed, 01 Mar 2017 11:52:40 +0000 Mike 88 at https://mikeonline.ca Coxton Yard https://mikeonline.ca/gallery_Coxton_Yard <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Coxton Yard</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 10/21/2013 - 15:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>History: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">Coxton Yard was built in 1870 by the <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lehigh_Valley_Railroad" target="_blank">Lehigh Valley Railroad Company</a> to facilitate the vast train activity required to support Pennsylvania's coal mining industry.  By the end of World War II, however, technology began catching up with the railroads.  Trucks on the expanding highway systems, and the move from coal to diesel-electric trains were bringing about the beginning of the end for operations at Coxton Yard.  It was finally abandoned in 1996, though the <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reading_and_Northern_Railroad" target="_blank">Reading and Northern Railroad Company</a> still uses the southern-most portion of the yard to support natural gas extraction.</p> <hr /><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>Personal Commentary: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">At first, I was planning to walk across the old rail bridge from the opposite side of the river.  I had parked, walked to the bridge, climbed up the steep side embankment and began the crossing.  A short distance across, however, it became increasingly treacherous, and I decided that perhaps it was not a good day to die.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">I drove around to the opposite side of the river and spoke with a neighbor living across the street from the gate to the yard.  He didn't think anyone would mind if I parked there, out of the way.  A short walk down the access road and my mind was blown.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">This yard is amazing, although I understand from previous pictures that there was once much more to behold.  Yet even in its diminished state, it was a bonanza for someone like me.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">The old train engines, the wheels, the parts and pieces everywhere.  The smoke from the burning fire... wait... fire?  A fellow explorer who was already on the site called my attention to a fire burning in a furnace inside the building.  Ok, someone had been here recently, it seems.  Good to know.  On with the exploration.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">One of the larger structures on the property was just north on the tracks.  A huge concrete something-or-other stood looming from the bush.  From the pulleys on top, it was clear this was some kind of elevator, perhaps for grain.  It wasn't until I found the historical photos above that I realized it was for loading coal that fuelled the trains.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">This was a truly amazing place to explore, and a fantastic way for me to start my Turkey Weekend Urbex Extravaganza.</p> <p class="text-align-justify"><strong>Update:</strong>  As of February, 2017, plans were underway to demolish the above-mentioned bridge during the summer of 2017 when the river is at its lowest.</p> <p class="text-align-justify"><strong>Update:</strong>  As of June 28, 2017, the County Redevelopment Authority received $1 Million to demolish the bridge.  Story attached in PDF below.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="field field--name-field-file-attachments field--type-file field--label-above"> <div class="field__label">File Attachments</div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"> <span class="file file--mime-application-pdf file--application-pdf"> <a href="https://mikeonline.ca/sites/default/files/2017-11/news_timesleader_20170628.pdf" type="application/pdf; length=1362158" title="news_timesleader_20170628.pdf">Times Leader - June 28, 2017 - County Redevelopment Authority Gets $1M to Demolish Coxton Bridge</a></span> </div> </div> </div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=62&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="utX_BPODh7H3Mw_tffZMP9vs39D7StU-NTbe9VjflJ0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 21 Oct 2013 19:15:00 +0000 Mike 62 at https://mikeonline.ca https://mikeonline.ca/gallery_Coxton_Yard#comments Trackside House https://mikeonline.ca/gallery_Trackside_House <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Trackside House</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Mon, 10/07/2013 - 03:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify">I would like to begin by thanking Pat and Robert, the owners, for allowing me in to photograph this fascinating old house.  They were very understanding and accommodating of my hobby and interests.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">When I arrived at this tiny seasonal community, I wasn't sure what to expect.  It was in a remote area of northern Ontario, near the railway tracks, and had a rich history in the logging industry.  Like so many similar small towns, there was a boom, rapid growth, then decline and eventually, nothing left but a near ghost town occupied by seasonal guests who enjoy the solitude for the warm months of the year.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">This house was, as far as anyone knows, one of the originals.  Just looking at it from the outside, it was apparent that its construction was of a much older style than most of the other structures around it.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Pulling up, I was greeted warmly by Robert as he worked on a small gas-powered generator.  We both spent a few moments wondering what engineering genius designed a bar over the spark plug making all but inaccessible.  Soon afterward, however, he opened the door and turned me loose.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">While many of the items there were clearly current storage, many more were vintage pieces that had come with the house.  The interior was simple, functional and of a style you will not see in anything of more modern construction.  The stairs alone were worth the visit with their sharp rise and narrow steps.  You could tell that even indoor plumbing, which we tend to take for granted, had been an afterthought, a luxury upgrade, in this tiny home.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">My curiosity sated, I bid my kind host farewell and continued with my weekend.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=440&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="rOwTvcJ0aIF5-mlkAfzM-LxbQgWX1I2z0-_VP1-7Ol0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Mon, 07 Oct 2013 07:15:00 +0000 Mike 440 at https://mikeonline.ca https://mikeonline.ca/gallery_Trackside_House#comments North Truro AFS https://mikeonline.ca/gallery_North_Truro_AFS <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">North Truro AFS</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 08/05/2011 - 15:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>History: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">Operations began here in 1951 with the 762d Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron moved in with two WWII-era AN/CPS-3 radars. Its role at this point was as a Ground Control Intercept station, vectoring intercept aircraft toward unidentified targets. In 1955, the <a href="https://urbexobsession.com/taxonomy/term/55" target="_blank">AN/FPS-8</a> radar was added to the base. This system was upgraded to AN/GPS-3 before being removed from service in 1960. In 1956, the primary search radar was the CPS-6B.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">The North Truro AFS was also the parent station to <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Texas_Tower_2" target="_blank">Texas Tower 2</a> from 1956 to 1963. In 1958, the station was also upgraded to include the <a href="/radar_FPS6" target="_blank">AN/FPS-6</a> and AN/FPS-6A height-finder radars. In 1958, it became part of the <a href="/dictionary_SAGE" target="_blank">SAGE</a> network, feeding data to the Stewart AFB in Newburgh, NY.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">1960 saw the installation of the <a href="https://urbexobsession.com/radar_FPS7" target="_blank">AN/FPS-7</a> search radar, and in 1963, the installation of <a href="https://urbexobsession.com/radar_FPS26" target="_blank">AN/FPS-26A</a> and AN/FPS-90 height-finder radar.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">North Truro was also parent to three gap-filler stations located in Westboro, MA (closed 1962), Fort Dearborn, NH (closed 1968), and Chilmark, MA (closed 1968).</p> <p class="text-align-justify">The station continued to upgrade and modernize until in 1985, the AN/FPS-107 was replaced by the AN/FPS-91A search radar. In 1994, the station was closed down and the property sold to the National Parks Service. An <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_Route_Surveillance_Radar" target="_blank">ARSR-4</a> continues to be used by the FAA and Homeland Security as part of the JSS project.</p> <hr /><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>Personal Commentary: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">When I looked at this place on Google Earth, it looked pretty interesting. I was surprised to see so many buildings still in tact and decided that it was definitely worth a look. I arrived on a hot afternoon to find the gates open, a couple of tents erected, and a few people milling about including someone in a uniform that looked distinctly like a Park Ranger. What the hell, let's go talk to the guy.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">As it turns out, the people and tents were there for the rehearsal of a play. After speaking with the Ranger, I had free run of the place, although he would never really be very distant. At every turn, I saw him driving slowly by in a cruiser, but always smiling, waving often.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">The buildings were all sealed, and although a few points of entry became apparent, my constant companion kept interior shots an impossibility. The only time I was alone was as I was exploring the houses on the adjacent property, but those too were largely sealed, and interiors not likely to be of great interest anyhow.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">All in all, this was a substantially sized station, and despite the lack of interiors, it was interesting to explore nonetheless.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=371&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="h2bqdLckl8cbs8i57bXqOFzNhH99oeE6-us1ubeRYew"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Fri, 05 Aug 2011 19:15:00 +0000 Mike 371 at https://mikeonline.ca https://mikeonline.ca/gallery_North_Truro_AFS#comments Bristol Mine https://mikeonline.ca/gallery_Bristol_Mine <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Bristol Mine</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Sun, 03/14/2010 - 15:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>History: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">Iron Mining began in this Quebec community as early as 1872. This specific open-pit operation began in 1956, under Hilton Mines. It featured one of the first ore-pelletizing plants in Canada. Production apparently ended, for the most part, in 1976.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">In 1979, it was rumoured that the mine may once again go into operation. According to an Ottawa Citizen article on July 27, 1979, both Les Industries Minieres de Hull and Sidbec were apparently interested in re-opening the mine, but it appears that nothing came of it.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">In 1986, the Town of Bristol passed a zoning bylaw that would make it illegal for the property owner to begin using the mine as a landfill site.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Today, it appears there is still some limited use though many of the outer buildings have fallen completely into disrepair.</p> <hr /><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>Personal Commentary:</strong> </p> <p class="text-align-justify">We were leaving Ottawa after a pleasant weekend, and decided to take an alternate route home. Crossing the river into Quebec, we followed the Ottawa River with the plan of crossing back into Ontario around Pembroke.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Near the town of Bristol, we detoured to check out this location, unsure of its current status or condition. The dirt roads were a little soft and slick and when we arrived, the surrounding area wasn't the best for walking.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Nevertheless, we began our exploration in earnest, ignoring the mud, the rain and the wind. After some time, we did spot the new building in the distance, and the lights around it that clearly indicated activity. At this point, an active property and the weather conditions finally convinced us to head back.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title">Comment</h2> <a id="comment-175"></a> <article data-comment-user-id="0" about="/comment/175" typeof="schema:Comment"> <h3 property="schema:name" datatype=""><a href="/comment/175#comment-175" class="permalink" rel="bookmark" hreflang="en">Current Use</a></h3> <!-- /.header --> <footer> <p class="submitted"><span rel="schema:author">Submitted by <span lang="" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Anonymous (not verified)</span> on Fri, 05/11/2012 - 09:50</span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2012-05-11T13:50:00+00:00" class="rdf-meta hidden"></span> </p> <span class="hidden new" data-comment-timestamp="1514823544"></span> </footer> <div> <div property="schema:text" class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-comment-body field--type-text-long field--label-hidden field__item"><p>The main use of this mine these days is processing the leftovers for road aggregates. I get trucks of crushed stone for fill from here and the township uses the aggregate for road shoulders etc. It has a nice red tone to it, as you can see on most Pontiac roads</p></div> </div> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderLinks" arguments="0=175&amp;1=default&amp;2=en&amp;3=" token="in9O7e7dtYI1jZGaK4TDLN-j7PU_HAXCQDrzD6V2Kgs"></drupal-render-placeholder> </article> <!-- /.comment --> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=604&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="phlBwJWch6YjrfR92RcTpO3GUcKcLkzdsSS-v3SFkNM"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Sun, 14 Mar 2010 19:15:00 +0000 Mike 604 at https://mikeonline.ca https://mikeonline.ca/gallery_Bristol_Mine#comments Balaclava https://mikeonline.ca/gallery_Balaclava <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Balaclava</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Fri, 03/13/2009 - 15:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>History:</strong> </p> <p class="text-align-justify">Balaclava was started with the sawmill in 1855 on Constant Creek. By the 1860's, a blacksmith and hotel had joined the permanent residents. The sawdust burner was constructed in 1903 to avoid polluting the river.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">In 1936, the mill had to be almost completely rebuilt after a fire.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">The mill remained in operation until 1959 by which time, much of the available timber had been depleted, and it closed. The store closed at about the same time.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">A few residents still remain in the area.<br /> -<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balaclava,_Renfrew_County,_Ontario" target="_blank">Wikipedia</a> and other sources.</p> <hr /><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>Personal Commentary: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">I decided to stop here as a side trip while on the way to Ottawa. I can't say that it was exactly what I had expected. I think the term "ghost town" has been thrown around a little too freely, as, in my mind, this did not really qualify as such.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">Certainly, Balaclava is not what it once was. But people do live here, and several vehicles drove by during my brief tour suggesting a lot of life for a dead community.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=634&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="a3L1DEumY8VYJ4BE84JxlIHFQf5rHTA5W0dStwEqnqw"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Fri, 13 Mar 2009 19:15:00 +0000 Mike 634 at https://mikeonline.ca Milnet https://mikeonline.ca/gallery_Milnet <span class="field field--name-title field--type-string field--label-hidden">Milnet</span> <span class="field field--name-uid field--type-entity-reference field--label-hidden"><span lang="" about="/user/1" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mike</span></span> <span class="field field--name-created field--type-created field--label-hidden">Sun, 10/07/2007 - 15:15</span> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep01 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field__item"><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>History: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">Milnet (originally named Sellwood Junction up to 1916) began as a stop along the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Northern_Railway" target="_blank">Canadian Northern Railway</a>. In 1917, after the railway was laid down, the Marshay Lumber Company built a mill and began a 22-year process of cutting trees from the area. Men from logging camps upstream would let the Vermilion River carry the logs to the mill in Milnet.<br /> -<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capreol#Ghost_towns" target="_blank">Wikipedia</a></p> <hr /><p class="text-align-justify"><strong>Personal Commentary: </strong></p> <p class="text-align-justify">The first time I arrived here, I couldn't help but notice one of Milnet's most prominent features, the stone fireplace and chimney. When you see this, especially first hand, you can't help but be impressed by the craftsmanship that must have gone into this. Not only has it survived the test of time, but also survived the demise of the house to which it belonged, and the elements it's endured since. You don't see that quality of work much any more.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">That aside, as I began to explore this small hamlet, I started to understand why those few who are still living here continue to do so. This is a pretty quiet corner of the world, with small lake behind that just seems the very definition of serene.</p> <p class="text-align-justify">The foundations and the depressions in the ground suggesting the sites of former buildings are evidence of what once was, but amid that quiet solitude, it's difficult to imagine Milnet for the bustling centre it once was.</p> </div> <div class="clearfix text-formatted field field--name-field-sep02 field--type-text field--label-hidden field__item"><hr /></div> <section class="field field--name-field-comment field--type-comment field--label-above comment-wrapper"> <h2 class="title comment-form__title">Add new comment</h2> <drupal-render-placeholder callback="comment.lazy_builders:renderForm" arguments="0=node&amp;1=637&amp;2=field_comment&amp;3=comment" token="pMtbq31Sn9aX2hFu6Ic5c2O9QS0c1zsZlxrmnHu4tB0"></drupal-render-placeholder> </section> Sun, 07 Oct 2007 19:15:00 +0000 Mike 637 at https://mikeonline.ca