Ontario

Roadside Restaurant and Gas

I decided to go camping for the long weekend, and by the time that decision was made, almost every provincial campground in Ontario was already reserved... except one. I arrived at Darlington Provincial Park after dark, and saw little. The next morning, however, while in search of breakfast, I spotted this place almost within spitting distance from the campground. They think of everything!

I would have to wait, however, as the OPP were using the entrance as a place to catch up on paperwork.

Rockwood Asylum for the Criminally Insane

History: 

Construction of Rockwood Asylum began in 1859 to house the "criminally insane" of Kingston Penitentiary. The asylum's site overlooking Lake Ontario was thought to have a calming effect on patients. The new limestone edifice - still situated near here - began accepting non-criminal patients in 1868. Rockwood became part of the Ontario provincial asylum system in 1877.

Hudson Bay Mine

History: 

Silver was first discovered in this area in 1908. Very shortly afterwards, this mine began operation. It is not known what quantities were produced during this phase of its operation, but it is known that it produced substantial quantities of both silver and cobalt.

Capitol Mine

I first saw this location late last year, but I was in search of a head-frame as listed in the AMIS database. Instead, at the coordinates listed, I found only a clearing made by the lumber company working this area. I went back this spring to have a closer look around and started with the old mill.

I decided that, rickety as it looked, I should climb the remains of the mill to get a closer look at what might remain inside. It was a slow, careful climb, but definitely worthwhile.

Osseo House

I spotted this place while on my way to look for some mines. Looking around the outside, I realized quickly that this was a home that had children at some point. This would be further reinforced by the things I found inside.

In addition, there were some... peculiar things I noted. I'll leave further interpretation to you without comment.

Grey Road House

First, this was not my discovery by any means, but that of a fellow explorer. As a result, I had a pretty good idea before we got there what we could expect to see.

As we walked up the narrow, lengthy driveway, I couldn't help but notice the strange crunching sound my steps made in the otherwise wet grass. When I looked down to see the cause, I was surprised to see that this place was CRAWLING with snails. They were everywhere!

Highway 26 House

This place was tucked behind a small pump-house, or some such small utility building. In addition, some bulldozed berms are around one side.

I pulled in off the highway and was kind of surprised by the place. In its day, I'm sure it was a pretty good place to live.

For now, however, I suspect its days are numbered. It looks as though development around it is continuing, and it's just a matter of time before this house is consumed, along with the adjacent apple orchard.

Wasaga Race Track

History: 

To the best of my knowledge, the track opened in 1956 and closed in 1970. Prior to construction of the car racing track, this same location had a horse-racing track.

The 1960's saw a decline in activity here, tapering continuously until its closure the following year.


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