Ontario

Tiny Abandoned Airport

History: 

This airport was built by Transport Canada in 1952, and was allegedly used as an operating base for CF-100 interceptors. It's primary runway, 11/29, is 6600 feet in length, and 200 feet wide.

There is mention that it was abandoned in 1958. Perhaps this was with regard to its military role, prior to its civilian utilization.

Mid Canada Line Test Site 012

History: 

At the early phase of the Cold War, the primary perceived threat was waves of Soviet bombers flying over the arctic to rain nuclear horror down upon North America. A line of radar stations across Canada, the Pinetree Line, was constructed to detect such an attack. But shortcomings in this line were being identified even before construction had been completed.

Field Lumber

History: 

The lumber mill in Field, Ontario was founded in 1914 by Zotique Mageau, and would provide employment for the town and surrounding areas for over 80 years.

On October 9, 1922, the original mill was destroyed by fire but soon rebuilt. The company was sold to Alfred Laberge, a Sudbury businessman in 1941, who in turn sold it to Jack Hope in 1956.

Wrigley Mansion

History: 

There are very few mentions of the history of this location online, and those are contradictory. Speaking with a local gentleman walking his dog, this is what I was able to learn.

Made from stone, and the victim of a devastating fire, this beautiful old house, and its scenic property are still being cared for by the current owner. It was built in the '50's, and the Wrigley's were good people who sold the products from their farm to the local community.

Zombie House

The name I gave this place derives from the fact that a friend of mine did a zombie photo shoot here. It was quite impressive.

The house itself is old. Very old. The construction suggests this may have been among the earliest homes in the area. Clearly electricity was an afterthought.

Rush Point House

While spending the weekend camping, I had opportunity to drive some back roads where I stumbled on this place. I decided I'd stop and have a look around. There wasn't a great deal inside, but what was there was fun to check out. The wooden shingles on the back side of the house were blackened in a way that suggested that perhaps there had been a grass fire very near. How the house didn't catch and burn is beyond me as it didn't look that it would take much.

Mouse House

This house was shared with me by a fellow explorer. I decided to go and have a look since I was camping not too far away from there. It was definitely worth it. All old houses that I've explored have their own unique character, but this one had something extra. I don't know what, I couldn't put a name on it if I had to, but just... something.

Tembec Sawmill

History: 

The buildings on this 136-acre property were first constructed in 1973 by Sklar Furniture. Later, it would be taken over by G.W. Martin and expanded. Tembec would eventually take over Martin's operations here, and the number of jobs would, at one point, peak at 500.