Canada

Holmes Foundry

History: 

Business here began in 1918 as Holmes Blunt Ltd., opened by J.S. Blunt. The foundry manufactured car parts, predominantly engine-casting blocks for Ford.

In 1937, the workers here took part in a sit-down strike. It was shortlived as, 48 hours later, the workers were driven away from the plant by armed and violent hired thugs.

Appin House

I caught a brief glimpse of this place by the side of the road and just had to stop. Its character was just screaming at the world to notice it and come closer. At least that's how I saw it.

The drawback was the two houses across the street. How were the neighbours going to react to my presence?

Chatham Incinerator

The first stop on my long-weekend trip was to explore an abandoned garbage incinerator in the town of Chatham, Ontario. There was very little reliable information on the history, when it was built, when it was decommissioned, etc., but it appeared to be an interesting enough place to check out.

Parham Mill

I spotted this place buried under the foliage and stopped in for a look. Almost immediately, however, I was set upon by a ravenous flock of mosquitoes who seemed determined to bleed me dry.

Unfortunately, I didn't stay long.

Breton's Restaurant and Motel

So, I've driven along this road countless times, and somehow this doesn't register on me until a couple of weeks ago. Yeah, sometimes I have tunnel vision.

It's not the most exciting place in the world. When I say it's gutted, I MEAN it's GUTTED. In the main building, there isn't even a floor left. It appears that someone had cut a hole in the end wall, and just drove a bulldozer in. There's even a dirt ramp to get in and out from the inside.

Monteith Mansion

On a warm, sunny Sunday, I set out with a list of targets programmed into my trusty GPS. Unfortunately, my GPS decided to be not-so-trusty. After a botched map upgrade, it essentially developed amnesia.

I only had an idea of the location of one of the targets off the top of my head, so I continued on my way.

I arrived and took a nice walk through the woods, following the path I assumed was the correct one. Rising up a hill, I could make it out through the trees. I had arrived.

Observatory House

History: 

From what I've been able to piece together, this building was originally constructed as a dedicated observatory for the Canadian Astronomical Research Group in 1976. The equipment, apparently including a 24" telescope, was removed in 1997, and the building converted into a private home.

Source: Journal of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada Newsletter, Vol. 71, p.L7

Tiny Abandoned Airport

History: 

This airport was built by Transport Canada in 1952, and was allegedly used as an operating base for CF-100 interceptors. It's primary runway, 11/29, is 6600 feet in length, and 200 feet wide.

There is mention that it was abandoned in 1958. Perhaps this was with regard to its military role, prior to its civilian utilization.

Mid Canada Line Test Site 012

History: 

At the early phase of the Cold War, the primary perceived threat was waves of Soviet bombers flying over the arctic to rain nuclear horror down upon North America. A line of radar stations across Canada, the Pinetree Line, was constructed to detect such an attack. But shortcomings in this line were being identified even before construction had been completed.